Atlantic Adventure: Last Day in Halifax

photo of a lighthouse in the fog
When we awoke the next morning, we discovered our AirBnB had no water. Neither of us had slept well either, making us two grumpy travelers. We packed up our bags and jumped in the car in search of coffee. However, a quick Yelp and Google scan of the area showed no coffee shops open until we reached downtown Halifax!

The landscape was covered in thick fog. Boats hung like ghosts in the water, sea and sky the same colour in the grey morning air. As we neared Peggy’s Cove, Matt pointed out how there were less trees and large boulders randomly dropped by glaciers. It reminded me of Iceland in a way.

Peggy’s Cove

We arrived in Peggy’s Cove at 7am. Hardly anyone was there and nowhere was open. Peggy’s Cove is supposed to be one of the most beautiful places in the world, but we couldn’t see much through the thick fog!

Train Station Bike & Bean Cafe

We retraced our steps to the Train Station Bike & Bean Cafe, a bike shop and cafe that opened at 7:30am. It was a very sweet place with lots of cozy seating. We each got a coffee and a breakfast sandwich, feeling much more alive with every sip and bite. Commuters stopped in on their way to work and everyone seemed to know one another. It was a friendly place.

photo of Peggys Cove lighthouse

Peggy’s Cove: Take Two!

The sun came out by the time we returned to Peggy’s Cove around 8:15am. There were a few photographers and videographers out on the rocks. The tour buses didn’t arrive until a bit later, giving us adequate time to snap some pictures of the famous lighthouse without swarms of people around.

photo of Peggys Cove
Once I’d exhausted the lighthouse, I wandered into the small village of Peggy’s Cove to take pictures of fishing boats. The fog returned without warning! My pictures went to blue to white sky without a transition. Fog goes well with fishing boats though, photographically speaking.

photo of white ricks in ocean water
Matt and I walked up to the Visitor Centre where we found a little path behind the parking lot. It led down to the water where we could enjoy the splash of waves and rocky landscape in solitude. Matt and I sat on a bench to watch the water for a bit before heading back in the car to continue our drive into Halifax.

photo of an empty taster glass at Propellor Brewery

Halifax

Propellor Brewery

Matt had spoken many times of Propellor Brewery from his days living in Halifax. It was his favourite Nova Scotian craft brewery! We stopped in at 10:30 (Nova Scotia serves beer a hour earlier than in Ontario) and shared a taster flight of pilsner, honey wheat, fiestbier, and a rye IPA. Our favourite was the honey wheat. It was a sweet, light, easy drinking beer.

photo of coffee cups

Gardens & Coffee

We decided to pick up some coffee before going to the Citadel to watch the noon time canon. Matt took me to Just Us, a large cafe in an old mansion that sells fair trade coffee and treats. They made a very good cup of coffee there!

We walked through the Halifax Public Gardens on our way to and from the cafe. I was very impressed by the landscaping of the gardens – it reminded me of fine gardens of Europe! It had a gazebo, a Victorian fountain, and lots of shaded benches to sit at where you could admire the pristine flowerbeds.

photo of a glowing lamp on a stone wall

Halifax Citadel

When Matt had lived in Halifax, he had always enjoyed the sound of the noon day canon at the Halifax Citadel. No matter the weather, you could depend on it for the time! However, he hadn’t actually seen it go off since he was a young boy, so we made our way up the hill in time to witness the daily rituals.

The canon was manned by five people in traditional military costume. It used 1LB of black gunpowder with no projectile. Apparently they used to use 4LB of powder which is the amount necessary to project a canon ball, but it would set off car alarms and shake windows. So they don’t do that anymore!

After the canon, we went to check out the Vimy Ridge exhibit. We walked into a recreation of a WWI trench. I was very impressed with the wooden periscopes you could look through with coloured photographs of Vimy Ridge over the top of the trench. It was very immersive and well done!

photo of a ceiling fan on a blue ceiling

The Economy Shoe Shop Restaurant

For lunch, Matt took me to the Economy Shoe Shop, a pub he used to frequent when he worked in the Halifax film and television industry. It didn’t look like much from the outside, but it was huge! Reminded me a bit of the Winter Garden Theatre in Toronto with its fake tree and old-fashioned ornate wood interior.

We ordered the nachos which Matt swore by. He got a pint of Propellor’s IPA and I got a watermelon wheat beer from Nine Locks in Dartmouth Nova Scotia. It was one of the best watermelon beers I’d ever had! The beer was very refreshing. Our waitress was wonderful as well – the Shoe Shop was all round a great place to go!

photo of a coromont in the Halifax Harbour

Halifax Waterfront Boardwalk

After lunch, we strolled down Salter Street and down to the Halifax harbour. There was a commuter ferry shooting across the harbour, which is part of the regular public transit service in Halifax! Apparently you can take a ferry from Dartmouth to Halifax just like you’d take a subway from East York to downtown Toronto!

The Drive Home

Doggy Disappointment

One of the highlights of the trip was finally meeting the breeders of the rare dog breed I want to adopt. We had tried to visit during the Christmas holidays, then I’d called on Monday and again today in addition to email and Facebook message to try and set up a time this trip. With no success, we decided just to drive by to see what the kennel looked like. It was set back from the road with a high hedge, so we couldn’t see much. We left disappointed – but at least we now know where it is. We figured we’d try again at Christmas, and if that still fails, we may have to look elsewhere.

photo of marshland bordered by evergreen trees

Joggins

We made a stop in Joggins on our way home to Moncton. It had a fossil beach that Matt had always wanted to visit but never found the time to when living in the Maritimes. Sadly, the Joggins Fossil Centre was closed early for the off season. So, we stopped to enjoy the view from a bridge opposite Matt’s family land on the Bay of Fundy. He’s always been curious to see Cape Enrage from across the water!

photo of a winding river sparkling in the sun

Apple River

We drove past Joggins to Apple River, a tiny collection of houses set back from the coast. The road up there was narrow, windy, and bordered with trees and shrubs – hardly a house in sight! As a kid, Matt had a pen pal from Apple River. He had sent a message in a bottle that Matt had picked up on the beach at Cape Enrage. We stopped on the bridge the that went over the river, imagining a little boy throwing a bottle over its edge many years ago on a sunny day just like this.

Moncton

We drove back to Moncton where Matt’s mother had a huge spread out on the table. It was a feast well worthy to end our whirlwind Atlantic Adventure! We’d traveled over 1800 km in three days – what a road trip!

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